To much stress, over training, emotional unresolved situations, a unhealthy diet and others can affect us when is time to go to bed and the consequences will manifest trough a unstable mood, your weight, hormones and a bad productivity during the day. I don’t know you but when I don’t sleep well apart from feeling tired during the day, I tend to eat more calories (specially crave for sweets and carbs). And if we are not sleeping well is definitely something we can’t ignore.

Penelope Cruz apparently gets anything up to 14 hours a night, Heidi Klum told People Magazine that she clocks 10 hours a night, pretty much going to sleep when the children do, while Catherine Zeta Jones and Renee Zelwegger swear it keeps them beautiful. Sleep is the most powerful rejuvenating treatment of them all. We discover the little-known facts of the big sleep.

Researchers say that how much you sleep and quite possibility the quality of your sleep may silently orchestrate a symphony of hormonal activity tied to your appetite.

“One of the more interesting ideas that has been smoldering and is now gaining momentum is the appreciation of the fact that sleep and sleep disruption do remarkable things to the body, including possibly influencing our weight,” says David Rapoport, professor and director of the Sleep Medicine Program at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City.

While doctors have long known that many hormones are affected by sleep, Rapoport says it wasn’t until recently that appetite entered the picture. What brought it into focus, he says, was research on the hormones leptin and ghrelin. First, doctors say that both can influence our appetite. And studies show that production of both may be influenced by how much or how little we sleep.

Have you ever experienced a sleepless night followed by a day when no matter what you ate you never felt full or satisfied? If so, then you have experienced the workings of leptin and ghrelin.

How these hormones affect your Sleep and Weight

Leptin and ghrelin work in a kind of “checks and balances” system to control feelings of hunger and fullness, which is produced in the gastrointestinal tract, stimulates appetite, while leptin, produced in fat cells, sends a signal to the brain when you are full.

So what’s the connection to sleep? “When you don’t get enough sleep, it drives leptin levels down, which means you don’t feel as satisfied after you eat. Lack of sleep also causes ghrelin levels to rise, which means your appetite is stimulated, so you want more food. The two combined, can set the stage for overeating, which in turn may lead to weight gain.

Conclusion: Add a few extra hours of sleep a week , particularly if you get only six hour of sleep or less a night. Try it! you may just discover that you aren’t as hungry, or that you have lessened your craving for sugary, calorie-dense foods.

Hope you guys enjoy this post…let me know what you think :)

Love,

Andrea